Monthly Archives: March 2015

Taking risks on unknown artists (or Burritos = Art)

Another blog from The Art House Southampton, who are wonderful and great supporters of the unknown artist like me

The Art House

Something that we are very fortunate to be able to do, as a not-for-profit venue, is take a chance on new or unusual artists.

Whether it’s hosting somebody’s very first exhibition to showcasing a scratch performance

An Art House moment - local musician Mike Vaughan starts to sing Steve Lowis' favourite song, Steve joins in.  You can't put a price on this stuff. An Art House moment – local musician Mike Vaughan starts to sing Steve Lowis‘ favourite song, Steve joins in. You can’t put a price on this stuff.

destined for the Edinburgh fringe, we are committed to making a space for art that isn’t necessarily a ‘sure thing’ in terms of money making.

We are a Community Interest company and our first aim on the list is ‘Promoting grassroots, fringe and outsider Art’.

We run an intimate, informal space where artists can experiment, take chances, and creativity can unfold at it’s own pace.

It costs us around £1 per minute to run, but what a lot can happen in one minute here!

How we…

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“Relationship Key Learns” or – “How Not To Be A Cock”

From my friend Bonnie

kzzinsky

I have had a few relationships over the years, most of which – hands up, it’s on me – ended out being utter car crashes due to poor choices on my part. I am not perfect; in fact, if you’ve been here a while, you will know that I write about exactly how NOT PERFECT I am.

However, we all inexplicably put up with unnecessary bullshit in relationships, and over the years I have identified a few important elements of friction-generating behaviour in my ex-partners. I am keen to share some tips with everyone to help you avoid unwittingly becoming the kind of boyfriend or girlfriend whose significant other has a desperate urge to throw heavy furniture at.

…also, it’s a bit funny. In retrospect.

In no particular order;

  • Don’t make a mess, and then complain about there being a mess.
  • Learn when your partner’s birthday is, and decide in…

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Paying for art

Recently I’ve been discussing monetary value of things. I was discussing how we price art but I think there is a wider issue about how people value art in general.

I am what some term as an amateur artist, I make art in my spare time. I don’t have to spend a lot of my time marketing my work to make sure I sell it to keep body and soul together. Many artists do. I exhibit my work and do commissions. I normally charge a small amount for these since if I charged a living wage for them (currently £7.85 in the UK) no one would buy one. For instance an A4 single colour drawing takes about 24 hours (spread over a couple of weeks) to do, so that is about £190. One of the A2 ones is anything from a month to 6 months.

Many artists have faced this issue how much do you charge for your work. I think very few of them charge a living wage for them, and like me are afraid that if they did no one would buy it. So we undervalue what we create often or just give it away.

One of the artists I greatly admire Amanda Palmer has talked about this a lot, yesterday she announced on Facebook that she had started a Patreon page

It works like this:
The artist puts together a package like Kickstarter, but the sponsorship is per item over the long term. Since yesterday 1,496 patrons are willing to give her $13,507.19 per thing. Which is pretty amazing. You can also put a cap on your sponsorship. So for instance I’ve set it at $3 per item to a max of $15 per month. Which means I control how much cash I pay out and the beauty of it is that I still get the material. There is no guarantee but also no money will be taken if she never creates another thing. And I trust her.

I think it is a pretty liberating thing to do. So every time she creates a piece of art we get it. The artist is free to create and do their magic and knows that at the end of it they will get a sum of money which will allow them to pay for their electric or phone bills, staff, food, etc. Does it sound familiar? It should it is how doing a job and being paid a salary works. You agree with your company to do work they pay you a sum of money for it.

Most artists don’t work like that. Most struggle day to day from commission to commission. Many have to have a paid job as well to keep themselves going while they create their art. Isn’t it time we recognised Artist as a legitimate job just like school teacher or administrator.

This way when Amanda creates a thing, she can push it straight out to the fans and won’t have to spend all her time pushing it out into the public domain, so she can create more art for more people.

I’ve read a few comments on people being negative about this approach but who said artists (whatever their art) have to live on the poverty line and live in a garret. Why shouldn’t they be paid enough money to live a decent life.

Since I last checked her page is now 1,527 patrons $13,680.19 per thing. I for one am very happy for her.

I wonder how it would work for an unknown, for instance what would happen if I did it? I wouldn’t expect anyone to give anything like this to me. But could I be paid a sum of money to create art to legitimise (if I need to) what I do? To give myself hope that my art is worth something? On the other hand do I care? I’d still do it without the payment.

What do you think?

Have a look at the other Patreon stories.